Pattishall IP Blog

May 12, 2017

Humanity Hates Trump may ________ Cards Against Humanity’s Trademark and Copyrights

Filed under: Copyright, Licensing, Trade Dress, Trademark (General) — Tags: , , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 10:42 am

By Paul A. Borovay

Chicago’s own Cards Against Humanity, the vulgar/raunchy/funny/the-opposite-of-politically-correct card game, filed a lawsuit against SCS Direct for its selling card sets called “Humanity Hates Trump.”[1]  Humanity Hates Trump – along with Humanity Hates Hillary Too!, to be non-partisan about it all – card sets are available on its website.[2]

SCS Direct displays the following disclaimer on its website:

This set is in no way endorsed or affiliated with Donald J. Trump himself or Cards Against Humanity™, a registered trademark of Cards Against Humanity LLC, nor does it represent the views of SCS Direct Inc.

The focus of the case is whether the Humanity Hates Trump cards infringe Cards Against Humanity’s trademark and copyrights.

Cards Against Humanity makes its cards available for free download through a Creative Commons license, namely, the “Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)” license.[3]  While the name is a mouthful, the license is actually rather simple.  Licensees can share, copy, and adapt the Cards Against Humanity game as long as they give credit to Cards Against Humanity, make their adapted product available under the same license, and not use the borrowed material for commercial purposes.[4]

SCS Direct clearly sells its Humanity Hates Trump cards online for commercial gain, and its cards use the same simplistic, black and white appearance of the Cards Against Humanity products.

The case touches on several interesting issues.  Is Cards Against product appearance protected under trade dress law?  Are its cards protected under copyright law?  Do the Humanity Hates Trump cards “remix, transform, and build upon the [Cards Against Humanity] material,” as described in the Creative Commons license?  Or, are the Humanity Hates Trump cards a separate product not covered under the CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 license?  How much latitude do licensees have under the license, or Creative Commons licenses in general, with respect to making, offering (for free), or selling “adapted” products?  Maybe none, maybe some.  We’ll see.

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[1] Cards Against Humanity LLC v. SCS Direct Inc. et al., case number 1:17-cv-02781 (E.D.N.Y. May 8, 2017).
[2] See https://humanityhatestrump.com/.
[3] See https://cardsagainsthumanity.com/ and http://s3.amazonaws.com/cah/CAH_MainGame.pdf.
[4] The license is available on the Creative Commons website.  See https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/.

These materials have been prepared by Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP for general informational purposes only.
They are not legal advice. They are not intended to create, and their receipt by you does not create, an attorney-client relationship.

March 17, 2017

Game Over for EMPORIUM ARCADE BAR service mark: “Merely Descriptive”

Filed under: TM Registration, Trademark (General), TTAB — Tags: , , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 9:31 am

 

 

 

 

By Jacquelyn R. Prom

On March 8, 2017, the Federal Circuit ruled[1] that the phrase ‘Emporium Arcade Bar’ is merely descriptive of arcade and bar services.

Emporium Arcade Bar is a popular Chicago bar offering a variety of old-school arcade games, pinball machines, draft beers, and cocktails. This crowd-pleasing spot opened its first location in 2012 in Wicker Park. In 2014, it opened a second location in Logan Square.

In 2014, Emporium also applied to register     as a service mark.[2] The Examining Attorney refused registration on the ground that the phrase is merely descriptive of Emporium’s arcade and bar services. Emporium tried to overcome the refusal by disclaiming the exclusive right to use ‘arcade bar’ apart from the mark as a whole. The Examining Attorney, however, required the additional disclaimer of ’emporium’ before the trademark could register. Emporium refused. It argued a disclaimer for ’emporium’ was unnecessary because the term does not immediately convey knowledge of its arcade and bar services. The Examining Attorney disagreed and issued a final refusal. Emporium appealed to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.

The TTAB affirmed the refusal,[3] finding ’emporium’ to be merely descriptive of arcade and bar services. Emporium again appealed, this time to the Federal Circuit.

The Federal Circuit affirmed the TTAB’s decision, ruling that the composite mark could not be registered without a disclaimer of all the wording due to each term’s descriptive nature. In reaching this conclusion, the court relied on dictionary definitions of emporium, arcade, and bar, as well as third-party trademark registrations that disclaimed ’emporium’ for restaurant, catering, and bar services.[4] The Federal Circuit also rejected Emporium’s argument that ‘Emporium Arcade Bar’ is a unitary mark. For these reasons, the court held ‘Emporium Arcade Bar’ was merely descriptive.

So for now it is game over for ‘Emporium Arcade Bar’ unless it is willing to disclaim all the wording in the composite mark, including emporium.

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[1] In re: Ddmb, Inc., Appellant, No. 2016-2037, 2017 WL 915102 (Fed. Cir. Mar. 8, 2017)

[2] Ser. No. 86/312,296

[3] In re Ddmb Inc., 86312296, 2016 WL 552609 (Jan. 29, 2016)

[4] E.g., Reg. No. 2216510 for the mark THE FLYING SAUCER DRAUGHT EMPORIUM, registered with a disclaimer of DRAUGHT EMPORIUM for “restaurant and bar services”; Reg. No. 3304948 for the mark MCDADE’S EMPORIUM, registered on the Supplemental Register with a disclaimer of EMPORIUM for “restaurant and bar services”; Reg. No. 2741163 for the mark THE FOOD EMPORIUM, registered under Section 2(f) with a claim of acquired distinctiveness and with a disclaimer of EMPORIUM for “retail grocery store and delicatessen services” and “catering and take-out delicatessen services”; and Reg. No. 2352358 for the mark GARDEN EMPORIUM, registered with a disclaimer of EMPORIUM for “catering services and restaurant services.”

 

These materials have been prepared by Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP for general informational purposes only.
They are not legal advice. They are not intended to create, and their receipt by you does not create, an attorney-client relationship.

March 8, 2017

Pattishall Prevails in 5th Circuit

Filed under: Litigation, Trademark (General) — Tags: , , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 12:02 pm

By Phillip Barengolts

Phil Barengolts and Jessica Ekhoff prevailed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit for Insignia Marketing and Christine McAtee in Vetter v. McAtee, No. 15-20575 (5th Cir. March 1, 2017), http://www.ca5.uscourts.gov/opinions/pub/15/15-20575-CV0.pdf. The Court upheld Insignia Marketing’s trial victory and affirmed the denial of Vetter’s request for attorneys’ fees against our clients.  The Court held the Lanham Act’s “fee-shifting provision vests significant discretion in the district courts to grant or deny attorneys’ fees on a case-by-case basis.”  The case was held not “exceptional” under the standards announced in Octane Fitness, LLC v. ICON Health & Fitness, Inc., 134 S. Ct. 1749 (2014).

 

These materials have been prepared by Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP for general informational purposes only.
They are not legal advice. They are not intended to create, and their receipt by you does not create, an attorney-client relationship.

March 2, 2017

The Marshall Tucker Band is still “Searchin’ for a Rainbow”[1] – and a trademark infringement that works

Filed under: TM Registration, Trademark (General) — Tags: , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 12:24 pm

Paul BorovayBy Paul A. Borovay

On March 1, 2017, a South Carolina federal judge dismissed The Marshall Tucker Band’s complaint against its publishing company alleging trademark infringement and dilution.[2]

The judge based her decision on the band’s failure to allege the publisher used the band’s trademarks in commerce.  The band relied entirely on the publisher’s trademark registrations, [3] as well as its statements to support its trademark applications that its marks were “now in use in . . . commerce.”

To establish trademark infringement under 15 U.S.C. § 1125(a) of the Lanham Act, a plaintiff must prove five elements, including that the defendant uses the mark “in commerce.”[4]  Section 15 U.S.C. § 1127 defines the term “use in commerce” to mean “the bona fide use of a mark in the ordinary course of trade, and not made merely to reserve a right in a mark.”

Stating that a mark is “now in use in . . . commerce” while prosecuting a trademark application is not the same thing as “using” a mark “in commerce.”  Judge Lewis cited Kusek v. Family Circle, Inc., 894 F. Supp. 522, 532 (D. Mass. 1995) for this notable proposition: “a federal registration [of a trademark] gives the owner of a mark legal rights and benefits, [but] its mere registration does not create the mark nor amount to ‘use’ of the mark [, and, therefore,] trademark registration per se cannot be considered as a use in commerce.”

While it has certainly been a “Long Hard Ride”[5] for The Marshall Tucker Band, the decision shows that a plaintiff cannot rely solely on defendants’ statements while prosecuting a trademark application to meet the Lanham Act’s “use in commerce” requirement.

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[1] “Searchin’ for a Rainbow” is the fourth studio album by The Marshall Tucker Band.
[2] Marshall Tucker Band Inc, The et al v. M T Industries Inc et al, No. 7:16-cv-00420 (D.S.C. March 1, 2017)
[3] See United States Trademark Reg. Nos. 4616427 and 4616428.
[4] 15 U.S.C. § 1125(a) requires the plaintiff to prove the following five elements: (1) that it possesses a mark; (2) that the defendant used the mark; (3) that the defendant’s use of the mark occurred in commerce; (4) that the defendant used the mark in connection with the sale, offering for sale, distribution, or advertising of goods or services; and (5) that the defendant used the mark in a manner likely to confuse consumers.
[5] “Long Hard Ride” is the fifth studio album by The Marshall Tucker Band.

 

These materials have been prepared by Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP for general informational purposes only.
They are not legal advice. They are not intended to create, and their receipt by you does not create, an attorney-client relationship.

August 15, 2016

2016 INTA/Pattishall Medal For Teaching Excellence: Annette Kur

Filed under: Pattishall, Trademark (General) — Tags: , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 10:08 am

rws_high_resby Robert W. Sacoff, Partner

As a student at Northwestern University School of Law, I had the good fortune to take Beverly Pattishall’s course on “Trademarks, Trade Identity and Unfair Competition.” This year, I chaired the INTA Pattishall Medal Committee. Here’s a little background on Mr. Pattishall, the Medal and the 2016 recipient, Dr. Annette Kur.

Mr. Pattishall (1916-2002) was born in Atlanta, Georgia, educated at Northwestern and the University of Virginia, and rose to the rank of Lieutenant-Commander in the U.S. Navy, commanding combat ships in World War II. After the war he returned to Chicago and began his distinguished legal career, focusing on trademark and unfair competition cases, and also devoted his energies to teaching the subject in law school courses. He unveiled this fascinating and important field of law to me and many others, at a time when it was not widely taught in depth in law schools. An active trial lawyer, he brought his classes to life with case experiences and litigation tips from the trenches.

To honor his educational contributions, the Pattishall, McAuliffe firm created the Pattishall Medal for Teaching Excellence in 1997, in conjunction with INTA’s Brand Names Education Foundation. This quadrennial Medal is awarded to top educators in the field, who have been nominated by their peers and students based on their:

  • Professional and academic recognition
  • Peer and student evaluation
  • Innovation in methodology and commitment to education in the field of trademarks and trade identity

Past recipients of the Medal are:

  • 1997 Arthur J. Greenbaum
  • 2000 J. Thomas McCarthy
  • 2004 Roger Schecter
  • 2008 Graeme Dinwoodie
  • 2012 David Vaver

(more…)

March 1, 2016

Nominate Your Favorite Trademark Law Professor for INTA’s Pattishall Medal

Filed under: Trademark (General) — Tags: , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 3:52 pm

rws_high_resby Robert W. Sacoff

The Pattishall Medal for Teaching Excellence was established in 2008 by the law firm of Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP, in cooperation with the International Trademark Association (INTA), in honor of Beverly W. Pattishall. The Medal is awarded every four years to recognize distinguished legal and business educators for outstanding instruction in the trademark, branding and trade identity field.

University, law school or graduate school professors are nominated by their peers or students, and the Pattishall Medal is presented to the individual who best exemplifies excellence and innovation in trademark, branding and trade identity education.  This year’s nominations are open until April 29, 2016.  Click here for details.

December 22, 2015

Federal Circuit Holds: “Disparagement” Clause of Lanham Act Violates the First Amendment

Filed under: Constitution, TM Registration, Trademark (General), TTAB — Tags: , , , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 5:13 pm

Widmaier_Uli_1 F LRBy: Uli Widmaier

I.  The Court’s Holding:

Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act, 15 USC § 1052(a), provides that trademarks that “disparage . . . persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols” shall not be federally registered (emphasis added).

On December 22, 2015, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, ruling en banc, held that this clause “is unconstitutional because it violates the First Amendment.” See In re Simon Shiao Tam, No. 2014-1203, slip op. at 62 (Dec. 22, 2015). Based on this holding, the Court vacated the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board’s determination that the mark THE SLANTS for “Entertainment in the nature of live performances by a musical band” is unregistrable as disparaging people of Asian descent.

II.   Practical Consequences:

The Federal Circuit is the statutorily designated Court of Appeals for all USPTO actions, see 15 USC § 1071(a). By holding that Section 2(a)’s disparagement clause is unconstitutional, In re Tam necessarily invalidates not only that clause, but also all USPTO precedents and rules that are based on in. Therefore, In re Tam has several immediate practical consequences:

  • Any disparagement grounds in currently pending Office Actions are no longer valid.
  • Any disparagement claims in currently pending opposition actions or petitions for cancellation must be withdrawn or dismissed.
  • No future trademark applications can be refused registration on disparagement grounds.
  • No future opposition or cancellation actions can validly be based on disparagement claims.

This describes the situation today. But it may not be the end of the matter. The issue may be bound for Supreme Court review, particularly given that a circuit split may emerge in short order. The famous REDSKINS case, in which the Board used the disparagement clause to cancel six trademark registrations of the NFL’s Washington Redskins, Pro-Football, Inc. v. Blackhorse, No. 1-14-CV-01043-GBL, 2015 WL 4096277 (E.D. Va. July 8, 2015), is currently on appeal before the Fourth Circuit. The case turns in substantial part on whether Section 2(a)’s disparagement clause violates the First Amendment. If the Fourth Circuit disagrees with the Federal Circuit’s holding and decides that there is no constitutional violation, then the Supreme Court is likely to step in and resolve the split between the Fourth and Federal Circuits on this important question of constitutional law.

If the Supreme Court were to agree with the Federal Circuit and hold that the disparagement clause is unconstitutional, then the practical implications listed above remain as they are at the moment. But if the Supreme Court were to hold that the disparagement clause is not unconstitutional, then the clause—and the USPTO regulations that depend on it—would be reinstated. What would that mean to any “disparaging” trademark registrations that were issued in the meantime? The answer is that such registrations would potentially be subject to cancellation on disparagement grounds.

III.   Takeaway:

For the time being, the practical takeaway from the Federal Circuit’s In re Tam decision is this. Trademark owners are now free to register disparaging marks, since the USPTO cannot refuse to register them on the ground of disparagement. And third parties cannot oppose applications or seek to cancel registrations on the ground of disparagement.

But any resulting registrations remain at some risk for cancellation, since the Supreme Court may well decide to review this issue. If so, the Supreme Court may overrule the Federal Circuit’s holding, whereupon the disparagement clause and the USPTO rules and precedents based on it would be reinstated.

Furthermore, a disparagement attack (should it be reinstated) cannot be averted via incontestability, since Section 14(3) of the Lanham Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1064(3), expressly permits incontestable registrations to be challenged on Section 2(a) grounds.

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Uli Widmaier is a partner with Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP, a leading intellectual property law firm based in Chicago, Illinois.  Pattishall McAuliffe represents both plaintiffs and defendants in trademark, copyright, and unfair competition trials and appeals. The firm advises its clients on a broad range of domestic and international intellectual property matters, including brand protection, Internet, and e-commerce issues.  Uli’s practice focuses on domestic and international trademark, copyright, trade dress and Internet law and litigation.

 

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July 7, 2015

Amazon.com Sued for Bait and Switch

Filed under: Internet, Litigation, Trademark (General) — Tags: , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 2:52 pm

baa_hiresBy: Brett A. August

In an important case for all companies whose products are sold on Amazon.com, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a district ruling yesterday that Amazon could not be sued for trademark infringement when it presented the goods of one watch maker in response to a search for another brand of watches.  In Multi Time Machine Inc. v. Amazon.com Inc., Case No. 13-55575, the Ninth Circuit (in a 2-1 decision) ruled that Amazon’s practices could confuse consumers into believing the watches displayed in the search results are put out by a company related to the manufacturer of the searched-for watches.

This is an important result for all vendors of branded goods who believe they are losing business to competitors due to Amazon’s failure to tell users of its website that the goods for which the customer is searching are not available on Amazon.com. The court noted that Amazon’s competitors – such as Buy.com and Overstock.com –  inform customers when the goods in their search terms are not sold on those websites.

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Brett August is a partner with Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP, a leading intellectual property law firm based in Chicago, Illinois.  Pattishall McAuliffe represents both plaintiffs and defendants in trademark, copyright, and unfair competition trials and appeals. The firm advises its clients on a broad range of domestic and international intellectual property matters, including brand protection, Internet, and e-commerce issues.  Brett’s practice focuses on domestic and international trademark, copyright, unfair competition, and Internet counseling and litigation.

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June 4, 2015

Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me – The Gov’t has Reduced Filing Fees ?

Filed under: TM Registration, Trademark (General) — Tags: , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 3:33 pm

rws_high_resby Robert W. Sacoff, Partner

The big news (this will sound a little wonky, but you really should know it) is that the USPTO has just recently (effective January 17, 2015) reduced certain trademark filing fees.  How often does that happen ?

Previously, the government fee for the filing mode most commonly used, TEAS, was $325 per class, for an electronic filing. Paper filing is still possible, at a higher fee, $375 per class, but hardly anybody does it any more.  Many applicants eschewed the “TEAS PLUS” option, even though it had and still has a lower filing fee (previously $275, reduced now to $225, per class) because it handcuffs you to using only the exact wording for the goods and services that comes straight out of the Acceptable ID Manual, which can be problematic for all but the simplest product descriptions.  But now, the USPTO has created a new filing mode, called TEAS RF, for Trademark Electronic Application System Reduced Fee (they do love their acronyms), which is an attractive hybrid.  It lowers the filing fee to $275 per class, and requires only that you do what you probably do anyway, like file everything electronically, provide an email address, and agree to email communications with the USPTO. It does not restrict you to using the exact ID Manual terminology like the TEAS PLUS option still does. USPTO data since January shows the desired results: “regular” TEAS applications have dropped, TEAS RF applications have increased, and overall efficiency has improved. See the Director’s Forum blog post of May 29, 2015 at http://www.uspto.gov/blog/.

The recent rulemaking also reduced the renewal filing fee from $400 to $300 per class.  You will still have to file a Section 8 Declaration of Use when you renew (the procedure was bifurcated previously to comply with the TLT, Trademark Law Treaty), and the Section 8 filing fee is still $100 per class.

The filing options, fees and requirements are laid out in a nice USPTO chart at http://www.uspto.gov/trademarks-application-process/filing-online/reduced-fees-teas-application-filing-options

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Robert Sacoff is a partner with Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP, a leading intellectual property law firm based in Chicago, Illinois. Pattishall McAuliffe represents both plaintiffs and defendants in trademark, copyright, trade secret and unfair competition trials and appeals, and advises its clients on a broad range of domestic and international intellectual property matters, including brand protection, Internet, and e-commerce issues.

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January 22, 2015

Supreme Court Finds Tacking to Be an Issue of Fact

Filed under: Trademark (General) — Tags: , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 9:17 am

Jason Koransky F HRby Jason Koransky, Associate

The doctrine of “tacking” deals with priority in trademark law. A trademark owner “tacks on” its period of using an earlier version of its mark to the time it has been using the current version of the mark. For tacking to be accepted by the court or the T.T.A.B., however, the respective versions of the marks must be “legal equivalents,” creating “the same, continuing commercial impression.” In a rare opportunity to decide a substantive issue of trademark law, on January 21 the Supreme Court in a unanimous opinion held that tacking is an issue to be decided by a jury. See Hana Financial, Inc. v. Hana Bank, 574 U.S. __ (2015). In affirming the Ninth Circuit’s decision that tacking is an issue of fact, the Court settled a circuit split, with the Federal Circuit and Sixth Circuit having held tacking to be an issue of law.

In this case, the petitioner Hana Financial began using its HANA FINANCIAL mark in commerce in 1995, and in 1996 obtained a federal registration of a logo that included the HANA FINANCIAL mark for financial services. Meanwhile, in 1994, the respondent Hana Bank started to advertise financial services under the name Hana Overseas Korean Club in the United States, targeting Korean expatriates. These advertisements included the name “Hana Bank” in Korean. In 2000, Hana Bank changed its name to Hana World Center, and in 2002 it started operating a bank in the U.S. called Hana Bank.

In 2007, Hana Financial sued Hana Bank for infringing its HANA FINANCIAL mark, and in response Hana Bank claimed priority based on tacking. The case went to trial, at which the jury was given a tacking instruction. The jury found that Hana Bank did not infringe the HANA FINANCIAL mark, and the district court denied Hana Financial’s motion for judgment as a matter of law.

In its brief and straightforward opinion, the Court wrote that tacking was properly in the jury’s hands as an issue of fact because “the tacking inquiry operates from the perspective of an ordinary purchaser or consumer.” It emphasized that it has “long recognized . . . that, when the relevant question is how an ordinary person or community would make an assessment, the jury is generally the decisionmaker that ought to provide the fact-intensive answer.”

The Court acknowledged that courts could decide a tacking issue in a bench trial or on summary judgment or judgment as a matter of law when the facts warrant such a determination. But when the parties request a jury trial, and summary judgment or JMOL is not warranted, tacking must be decided by the jury.

The Court rejected the four arguments Hana Financial made for why tacking is an issue of law. First, even though the “legal equivalents” test in tacking involves the application of a legal standard, the court found no reason why the jury could not properly apply that standard, essentially stating in dicta that the jury could consider this mixed question of law and fact. Next, it rejected Hana Financial’s argument that tacking questions must be decided by comparing the marks at issue to the marks in other tacking cases. Third, it found that juries deciding tacking would not make the trademark system “unpredictable.” Finally, it found that courts have not historically decided the issue of tacking as a matter of law, and that Hana Financial’s cited cases in which the court ruled on tacking included bench trials and summary judgments.

On its facts, Hana holds only that tacking an issue of fact for the jury. But the analysis seems to apply to other issues in trademark law as well, such as likelihood of confusion – even though the opinion does not address these other issues. If Hana is extended to such other issues, it could make it more difficult to obtain summary judgment in trademark litigation.

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Jason Koransky is an associate with Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP, a leading intellectual property law firm based in Chicago, Illinois. Pattishall McAuliffe represents both plaintiffs and defendants in trademark, copyright, trade secret and unfair competition trials and appeals, and advises its clients on a broad range of domestic and international intellectual property matters, including brand protection, Internet, and e-commerce issues. Jason’s practice focuses on trademark, trade dress, copyright and false advertising litigation, domestic and international trademark prosecution and counseling, and privacy issues. He is co-author of the book Band Law for Bands, published by the Chicago-based Lawyers for the Creative Arts.

 

 

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