Pattishall IP Blog

March 2, 2017

The Marshall Tucker Band is still “Searchin’ for a Rainbow”[1] – and a trademark infringement that works

Filed under: TM Registration, Trademark (General) — Tags: , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 12:24 pm

Paul BorovayBy Paul A. Borovay

On March 1, 2017, a South Carolina federal judge dismissed The Marshall Tucker Band’s complaint against its publishing company alleging trademark infringement and dilution.[2]

The judge based her decision on the band’s failure to allege the publisher used the band’s trademarks in commerce.  The band relied entirely on the publisher’s trademark registrations, [3] as well as its statements to support its trademark applications that its marks were “now in use in . . . commerce.”

To establish trademark infringement under 15 U.S.C. § 1125(a) of the Lanham Act, a plaintiff must prove five elements, including that the defendant uses the mark “in commerce.”[4]  Section 15 U.S.C. § 1127 defines the term “use in commerce” to mean “the bona fide use of a mark in the ordinary course of trade, and not made merely to reserve a right in a mark.”

Stating that a mark is “now in use in . . . commerce” while prosecuting a trademark application is not the same thing as “using” a mark “in commerce.”  Judge Lewis cited Kusek v. Family Circle, Inc., 894 F. Supp. 522, 532 (D. Mass. 1995) for this notable proposition: “a federal registration [of a trademark] gives the owner of a mark legal rights and benefits, [but] its mere registration does not create the mark nor amount to ‘use’ of the mark [, and, therefore,] trademark registration per se cannot be considered as a use in commerce.”

While it has certainly been a “Long Hard Ride”[5] for The Marshall Tucker Band, the decision shows that a plaintiff cannot rely solely on defendants’ statements while prosecuting a trademark application to meet the Lanham Act’s “use in commerce” requirement.

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[1] “Searchin’ for a Rainbow” is the fourth studio album by The Marshall Tucker Band.
[2] Marshall Tucker Band Inc, The et al v. M T Industries Inc et al, No. 7:16-cv-00420 (D.S.C. March 1, 2017)
[3] See United States Trademark Reg. Nos. 4616427 and 4616428.
[4] 15 U.S.C. § 1125(a) requires the plaintiff to prove the following five elements: (1) that it possesses a mark; (2) that the defendant used the mark; (3) that the defendant’s use of the mark occurred in commerce; (4) that the defendant used the mark in connection with the sale, offering for sale, distribution, or advertising of goods or services; and (5) that the defendant used the mark in a manner likely to confuse consumers.
[5] “Long Hard Ride” is the fifth studio album by The Marshall Tucker Band.

 

These materials have been prepared by Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP for general informational purposes only.
They are not legal advice. They are not intended to create, and their receipt by you does not create, an attorney-client relationship.

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