Pattishall IP Blog

September 27, 2012

Publication of Noelia’s Secret Wedding Photos Not Fair Use, Ninth Circuit Finds

Filed under: Copyright, First Amendment, Litigation — Tags: , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 4:10 pm

By: Seth I. Appel

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that a gossip magazine’s publication of photographs of a secret celebrity wedding did not constitute fair use under the Copyright Act.  Monge v. Maya Magazines, Inc., 688 F.3d 1164 (9th Cir. Aug. 14, 2012).

Noelia Lorenzo Monge, the Puerto Rican pop singer and model known to the world as Noelia, married her manager, Jorge Reynoso, in January 2007.  The couple attempted to keep their marriage a secret to maintain Noelia’s image as a single sex symbol.  Only the minister and two chapel employees witnessed the wedding ceremony.  For two years Noelia and Reynoso succeeded in keeping their marriage a secret, even from their families.

In the summer of 2008, Oscar Viqueira, a paparazzo who worked as a driver and bodyguard for Noelia and Reynoso, discovered a memory chip containing photographs of the wedding night.  Viqueira sold the photos to Maya Magazines for $1,500, without Noelia’s or Reynoso’s permission.

Maya published three photos of the wedding ceremony, and three additional photos from the wedding night, in Issue 633 of TVNotas Magazine.  Until then, the photos had been unpublished.  The TVNotas cover headline stated:  “The Secret Marriage of Noelia and Jorge Reynoso in Las Vegas.”  The photo spread inside referred to the “first and exclusive photos of the secret wedding.”  Issue 633 was the first time the public learned of the wedding – including Reynoso’s mother, who berated her son for getting married without telling her.

Noelia and Reynoso promptly registered the copyrights in five of the photos and then brought suit against Maya for copyright infringement.  The Central District of California granted summary judgment in favor Maya based on fair use.  2010 WL 3835053 (Sept. 30, 2010).  The Ninth Circuit reversed.

Fair use is an affirmative defense to copyright infringement.  The fair use doctrine, the Ninth Circuit explained, presumes that unauthorized copying has occurred but protects such copying under certain circumstances.  Section 107 of the Copyright Act enumerates four factors for courts to consider in evaluating a fair use defense:

(1)       the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes;

(2)       the nature of the copyrighted work;

(3)       the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and

(4)       the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work. (more…)

September 10, 2012

When Does the First Amendment Trump Trademark Law? 11th Circuit Adopts Rogers v. Grimaldi Test

Filed under: Constitution, First Amendment, Litigation — Tags: , , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 2:08 pm

By Janet Marvel, Partner

In 1989, the Second Circuit adopted a balancing test to weigh the value of an artist’s First Amendment rights against the value of trademarks depicted in the artist’s work.  Rogers v. Grimaldi, 875 F.2d 994 (9th Cir. 1989).  In June of this year, the 11th Circuit adopted essentially the same test in University of Alabama Board of Trustees v. New Life Art, Inc., 683 F.3d 1266 (11th Cir. June 11, 2012).

Some Background

In Rogers v. Grimaldi, 875 F.2d 994 (9th Cir. 1989), Ginger Rogers sued over an Italian film titled “Ginger and Fred,” which was about two cabaret performers who imitated Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire.  Ms. Rogers alleged violations of her rights under the federal trademark statute (the Lanham Act) and of her right of publicity under state law.  The district court dismissed the claim and the Second Circuit affirmed.  The court stated that enjoining the distribution of artistic works does not violate the First Amendment where the public interest in avoiding consumer confusion outweighs the public interest in free expression.  For movie titles, the court stated that unless the title had no artistic relevance to the underlying work or was expressly misleading, no injunction should issue.  Other courts have adopted similar tests, including the Sixth Circuit, in ETW v. Jireh Publishing, Inc., 332 F.3d 915 (6th Cir. 2003), where the court permitted defendant’s use of Tiger Woods’ name on the inside flap of an envelope containing an art print featuring his image, and in the narrative description for the print.  See also ESS Entertainment 2000, Inc. v. Rock Star Videos, Inc., 547 F.3d 1095 (9th Cir. 2008) (scene in a video game featuring trademark of plaintiff’s entertainment club did not infringe plaintiff’s trademark rights).

The Crimson and White

In University of Alabama Board of Trustees v. New Life Art, Inc., 683 F.3d 1266 (11th Cir. June 11, 2012), the University sued an artist who, for over thirty years, had painted and sold images of plays in University of Alabama football games.  The parties had entered into various licensing agreements, apparently licensing some University of Alabama logos, among other things.  In 2002, the University demanded that the artist take a license for all of his works because they depicted University uniforms in the colors crimson and white, which the University stated were its trademarks.  The artist declined, arguing that he did not need a license to depict University trademarks within his images.

The court separately considered the parties’ respective rights in calendars, and large-size paintings and prints, and “mundane products,” comprising such things as “‘mini-prints,” mugs, cups, flags, and towels. (more…)

November 22, 2011

First Amendment Right To Anonymous Speech Trumps Right To Discover Identity Of Blogger Alleged To Have Infringed Copyrighted Works of Art Of Living Foundation

Filed under: Constitution, Copyright, First Amendment — Tags: , , — Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP @ 1:02 pm

Categories: Copyright, First Amendment, Constitution

Tags: First Amendment, Discovery , Phillip Barengolts

by Phillip Barengolts, Trademark Attorney

“Skywalker’s First Amendment right to anonymous speech outweighs the need for discovery at this time.” Art of Living Foundation v. Does 1-10, No. 10-cv-05022 (N.D. Cal. Nov. 9, 2011).[1]  This statement and the decision in Art of Living Foundation has significant consequences for intellectual property owners pursuing claims against defendants hiding behind privacy services, pseudonyms, or using other identity blocking methods – an increasingly common obstacle to enforcing intellectual property rights.

But first, a few words about the parties.  The Art of Living Foundation (“AOLF”) is an international “educational and humanitarian” organization dedicated to teaching the spiritual lessons of “His Holiness Ravi Shankar.”[2]  Technically, the plaintiff in this case is the U.S. branch of AOLF.  The defendants, who go by the pseudonyms “Skywalker” and “Klim,” write blogs that criticize AOLF.  Allegedly, they are disgruntled former participants in AOLF.

After filing a complaint for defamation, trade secret misappropriation, trade libel, and copyright infringement, AOLF sought expedited discovery to learn the true identities of Skywalker and Klim.  The magistrate in the case granted this request and AOLF issued subpoenas to Google and Automattic – the companies that host the defendants’ blogs.  AOLF’s stated purpose for the subpoenas was to serve the complaint upon the defendants.  The defendants made special appearances through counsel to move to quash these subpoenas, among other motions that ultimately left only the copyright and trade secret misappropriation claims pending.[3]

(more…)

The Silver is the New Black Theme Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 72 other followers